World Mental Healthcare Association

People With Dementia And Chronic Pain Prefer To live Shorter Lives, Study Says

People With Dementia And Chronic Pain Prefer To live Shorter Lives
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News: Among Norwegians 60 years of age and older the desire to live into advanced ages was significantly reduced by hypothetical adverse life scenarios with the strongest effect caused by dementia and chronic pain, according to new research conducted at the Robert N. Butler Columbia Aging Center based at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health.

There is a lack of sufficient data on how long older adults prefer to live when going through adverse health and living changes in health.

Researches from Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health investigated investigate the relationship between six adverse health and living conditions and preferred life expectancy after the age of 60 years.

The research team asked the 825 community dwellers aged 60 and older the question, “If you could choose freely, until which age would you wish to live?”

The study findings published in the journal Age and Ageing showed that among Norwegians 60+, the desire to live into advanced ages is significantly reduced by hypothetical adverse life scenarios, with the strongest effect caused by dementia and chronic pain.

“Dementia tops the list of conditions where people would prefer to live shorter lives — which is a particular challenge given the rapid increase in dementia in the years ahead,” Said Vegard Skirbekk, PhD, professor of Population and Family Health.

To Know More You May Refer To:

Skirbekk, V., Langballe, E. M., & Strand, B. H. (2021). Preferred life expectancy and the association with hypothetical adverse life scenarios among norwegians aged 60+. Age and Ageing. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afab113

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